Gila River Health Care Corporation
Gila River Health Care Corporation
PROVIDER MANUAL
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Arizona Department of Health Services

Division of Behavioral Health Services
PROVIDER MANUAL
Gila River Regional Behavioral Health Authority Edition


Section 9.3 Parent/Family Support Provider Training, Certification, and Supervision Requirements


9.3.1 Introduction
9.3.2 References
9.3.3 Scope
9.3.4 Definitions
9.3.5 Objectives
9.3.6 Procedures
9.3.6-A. Parent/Family Support Provider and Trainer Qualifications
9.3.6-B. Parent/Family Support Provider Training Program Approval Process
9.3.6-C. Competency Exam
9.3.6-D. Parent/Family Support Provider Employment Training Curriculum Standards
9.3.6-E. Supervision of certified Parent/Family Support Providers
9.3.6-F. Process of Certification


9.3.1 Introduction
The Arizona Department of Health Services/Division of Behavioral Health Services (ADHS/DBHS) has developed training requirements and certification standards for Family Support roles providing Family Support Services, as described in the ADHS/DBHS Covered Behavioral Health Services Guide. ADHS/DBHS recognizes the importance of the Certified Family Support role as a viable component in the delivery of integrated services and expects statewide support for these roles. ADHS/DBHS expects consistency and quality in parent/family delivered support of integrated services in both the Children’s and Adult Systems statewide.

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9.3.2 References
The following citations can serve as additional resources for this content area:

9.3.3 Scope
To Whom Does this Apply?

All behavioral health providers delivering training services for certification of individuals as Parent/Family Support Providers within the ADHS/DBHS public behavioral health system.

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9.3.4 Definitions
Definitions for terms are located online at http://www.azdhs.gov/bhs/definitions/index.php. The following terms are referenced in this section:

Adult Recovery Team

Advance Directive

Behavioral Health Paraprofessional

Behavioral Health Professional

Behavioral Health Technician

Caregiver

Child and Family Team

Court Ordered Treatment

Covered Behavioral Health Services Guide

Empowerment

Engagement

Family

Family Finding Techniques

Family Involvement

Individual Service Plan

Integrated health care services/integrated care

Lived experience

Natural Support

Recovery

Resilience

Stigma

Youth/Young Adult-Delivered Support

9.3.5 Objectives
To ensure that behavioral health providers and those providing Family Support Services have the necessary knowledge and skills to successfully provide quality behavioral health services in the public behavioral health system.

To ensure that Parent/Family Employment Training Certification Programs offer training and education that effectively prepares individuals for delivering behavioral health services, including Parent/Family Services.

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9.3.6 Procedures

9.3.6-A Parent/Family Support Provider and Trainer Qualifications
Individuals seeking certification and employment as Parent/Family Support Provider or Trainer in the children’s system must:

  • Be a parent or primary caregiver with lived experience who has raised or is currently raising a child with emotional, behavioral, mental health or substance abuse needs; and

  • Meet the requirements to function as a behavioral health professional, behavioral health technician, or behavioral health paraprofessional.

Individuals seeking certification and employment as Parent/Family Support Provider or Trainer in the adult system must:

  • Have lived experience as a primary natural support for an adult with emotional, behavioral, mental health or substance abuse needs; and

  • Meet the requirements to function as a behavioral health professional, behavioral health technician, or behavioral health paraprofessional.

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9.3.6-B. Parent/Family Support Provider Training Program Approval Process
A Parent/Family Support Provider Training Program must submit their program curriculum, competency exam, and exam-scoring methodology (including an explanation of accommodations or alternative formats of program materials available to individuals who have special needs) to ADHS/DBHS. ADHS/DBHS will issue feedback or approval of the curriculum, competency exam, and exam-scoring methodology in accordance with section 9.3.6-D.

Approval of curriculum is binding for no longer than three years. Three years after initial approval and thereafter, the program must resubmit their curriculum for review and re-approval. If a program makes substantial changes (meaning change to content, classroom time, etc.) to their curriculum or if there is an addition to required elements (see section 9.3.6-D.) during this three-year period, the program must submit the updated content to ADHS/DBHS for review and approval no less than 60 days before the changed or updated curriculum is to be utilized.

ADHS/DBHS will base approval of the curriculum, competency exam, and exam-scoring methodology only on the elements included in this policy. If a Parent/Family Support Provider Training Program requires regional or culturally specific training exclusive to a GSA or specific population, the specific training cannot prevent employment or transfer of family support certification based on the additional elements or standards.

9.3.6-C. Competency Exam
Individuals seeking certification and employment as a Parent/Family Support Provider must complete and pass a competency exam with a minimum score of 80% upon completion of required training. Each Parent/Family Support Provider Training Program has the authority to develop a unique competency exam. However, all exams must include questions related to each of the curriculum core elements listed in section 9.3.6-D. Agencies employing Parent/Family Support Providers who are providing family support services are required to ensure that their employees are competently trained to work with their population.

Individuals certified in another state may obtain certification after passing a competency exam. If an individual does not pass the competency exam, the Parent/Family Support Provider Training Program shall require that the individual complete additional training prior to taking the competency exam again.

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9.3.6-D. Parent/Family Support Employment Training Curriculum Standards
A Parent/Family Support Employment Training Program curriculum must include the following core elements for persons working with both children and adults:

  • Communication Techniques:
    • Person first, strengths-based language; using respectful communication; demonstrating care and commitment;
    • Active listening skills: The ability to demonstrate empathy, provide empathetic responses and differentiate between sympathy and empathy; listening non-judgmentally;
    • Using self-disclosure effectively; sharing one’s story when appropriate;
       
  • System Knowledge:
    • Overview and history of the Arizona Behavioral Health (BH) System: Jason K. Arizona Vision and 12 Principles and the Child and Family Team (CFT) process; Guiding Principles for Recovery-Oriented Adult Behavioral Health Services and Systems, Adult Recovery Team (ART), and Arnold v. Sarn; Introduction to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA); funding sources for behavioral health systems:
      • Overview and history of the family and peer movements; the role of advocacy in systems transformation.
      • Individual Service Planning (ISP); tailored to meet the individual needs;
      • Rights of the caregiver/enrolled member; complaints, grievances and the appeal processes; life planning guardianship, powers of attorney, special needs trusts, mental health advanced directives;
      • Transition Aged Youth: Role changes when bridging the Adult System of Care (ASOC) and Children’s System of Care (CSOC) at transition for an enrolled member, family and team;
      • Integrated health care services/integrated care;
      • Trauma Informed Care
    • Introduction to adult and child serving systems: Department of Child Safety (DCS); Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDD), Juvenile Probation and the Juvenile Justice System; Justice System, Court Ordered Treatment (COT), Mental Health Court, Corrections, Probation, Parole; Adult Protective Services; Social Security;
    • Overview of confidentiality laws and information sharing; Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA); mandated reporting requirements;
      • Professional responsibilities regarding disclosure and sharing of information and records unique to adult family support;
    • Codes of Ethics;
    • Overview of Individualized Education Programs (IEP); Section 504;
    • Overview of documentation and billing requirements.
       
  • Building Collaborative Partnerships and Relationships:
    • Engagement; Identifies and utilizes strengths;
    • Utilize and model conflict resolution skills, interest-based negotiation skills, problem solving skills, and shared decision making;
    • Cultural diversity; cultural awareness; understanding individual and family culture; social culture; biases; perceptions; system’s cultures;
    • The ability to identify, build and connect individuals and families, including families of choice to natural, community and informal supports;
    • Family finding techniques;
    • Family-Driven/youth-guided care.
       
  • Crisis Prevention, Intervention and Safety Planning:
    • Positive behavioral reinforcement, stabilization and de-escalation techniques;
    • Overview of suicide prevention;
    • Overview of crisis planning;
    • Overview of 24-hour safety planning
       
  • Goal Setting and Empowerment:
    • Coaching family members and other supports to identify their needs, develop goals and promote self-reliance;
      • Identify and understand stages of change;
      • Identify and use natural supports;
      • Ability to identify unmet needs when progress is not being made.
    • Understanding developmental milestones for infants, children, adolescents and adults;
    • Understand how to assist individual or family member to access information related to diagnoses or treatments including the use of medications;
    • Attributes of meaningful involvement: Access, voice and ownership.
       
  • Wellness:
    • The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Eight (8) Dimensions of Wellness:
    • Understanding the stages of grief and loss; and
    • Understanding self-care and stress management;
    • Addressing stigma;
    • Understanding compassion fatigue, burnout, and trauma;
    • Resiliency and recovery;
    • Planning and managing for personal safety;
    • Healthy personal and professional boundaries.

Some curriculum elements include concepts that are part of ADHS/DBHS required training, as described in PM Section 9.1, Training Requirements. Parent/Family Support Provider training programs must not duplicate training required of individuals for employment with a licensed agency or Community Service Agency (CSA)1. Training elements in this section must be specific to the Family Support role in the public behavioral health system and instructional for family support interactions. For a list of references to assist in developing a curriculum that addresses the topics listed in the Curriculum Standards, see PM Attachment 9.3.1, Suggested Curriculum Development References. T/RBHAs must develop and make available policies and procedures as well as additional resources for development of curriculum, including T/RBHA staff contacts for questions or assistance.

9.3.6-E. Supervision of certified Parent/Family Support Providers
Agencies employing Parent/Family Support Providers must provide supervision by individuals qualified as Behavioral Health Technicians or Behavioral Health Professionals. Supervision must be appropriate to the services being delivered and the qualifications of the Parent/Family Support Provider as a Behavioral Health Technician, Behavioral Health Professional, or Behavioral Health Paraprofessional. Supervision must be documented and inclusive of both clinical and administrative supervision.

Individuals providing supervision must receive training and guidance to ensure current knowledge of best practices in providing supervision to Parent/Family Support Providers. (For more information, see DBHS Practice Protocol, Clinical Supervision.)

T/RBHAs must develop and make available to the providers policies and procedures regarding resources available to agencies for establishing supervision requirements and any expectations for agencies regarding T/RBHA monitoring/oversight activities for this requirement.

9.3.6-F. Process of Certification
T/RBHAs must ensure that Parent/Family Support Providers meet qualifications and have certification, as described in this policy. Agencies employing Certified Parent/Family Support Providers who are providing family support services are responsible for keeping records of required qualifications and certification.

T/RBHAs must develop and make available to providers policies and procedures that describe monitoring and auditing/oversight activities where personnel files of Parent/Family Support Provider are reviewed.

1 While Parent/Family Support Provider Employment Training Programs must not duplicate training required of licensed agencies or CSAs, it is possible that licensed agencies and/or CSAs may consider training completed as part of the family support employment training program as meeting the agencies’ training requirements.

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9.3 Parent/Family Support
Last Revised: 2/28/2016
Effective Date: 2/28/2016

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