Gila River Health Care Corporation
Gila River Health Care Corporation
PROVIDER MANUAL
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Arizona Department of Health Services

Division of Behavioral Health Services
PROVIDER MANUAL
Gila River Regional Behavioral Health Authority Edition


Section 3.19 Special Populations

3.19.1 Introduction
3.19.2 References
3.19.3 Scope
3.19.4 Did you know…?
3.19.5 Definitions
3.19.6 Objectives
3.19.7 Overview
3.19.8 Procedures
3.19.8-A. SABG Block Grant
3.19.8-B. MHBG Block Grant

3.19.1 Introduction
ADHS/DBHS receives Federal grants and State appropriations to deliver behavioral health services to special populations in addition to Federal Medicaid (Title XIX) and the State Children’s Health Insurance Program (Title XXI) funding. The grants are awarded by a Federal agency and made available to ADHS/DBHS. ADHS/DBHS then disburses the funding throughout Arizona for the delivery of covered behavioral health services in accordance with the requirements of the fund source.

This section is intended to present an overview of the major Federal grants that provide ADHS/DBHS and the public behavioral health system with funding to deliver services to persons who may otherwise not be eligible for covered behavioral health services. It is important for behavioral health providers to be aware of:

  • Who is eligible to receive services through these funding sources;
  • How the funds are prioritized; and
  • What services are available through each funding source.

3.19.2 References
The following citations can serve as additional resources for this content area:

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3.19.3 Scope
To whom does this apply?

Persons who are eligible to receive behavioral health services through the Substance Abuse Block Grant (SABG), and the Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) Program.

3.19.4 Did you know?

  • ADHS/DBHS is the designated Single State Authority in Arizona to administer the SABG Block Grant.
  • SABG funding may only be expended on individuals or services not covered by Title XIX or Title XXI.
  • T/RBHAs receiving SABG Block Grant funds are required to develop, expand and enhance a continuum of specialized care for pregnant females and females with dependent children up to the full annual grant award for substance abuse treatment services.
  • A T/RBHA or provider may not deny any person SABG Block Grant funded treatment services based on age.
  • ADHS/DBHS maintains a SAPT Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) document, accessible on its website.
  • MHBG Block Grant funds are allocated to provide services for Adult SMI and Child SED persons.
  • Co-payments, or any other fee, are prohibited for the provision of services funded by the SABG or MHBG Block Grants.
  • The MHBG Block Grant requires the State to maintain a statewide planning council with representation by consumers, family members, State employees and providers.
  • Another resource, the PATH Grant, provides outreach services designed to assist individuals who are homeless or at imminent risk of becoming homeless who are suspected to have or have been determined to have a serious mental illness or co-occurring serious mental illness and substance use disorder. The services are to be provided in locations where persons who are homeless gather, such as food banks, parks, vacant buildings and the streets.
  • PATH grant funds are allocated by DBHS based on a competitive request for proposals (RFP) process and direct provider contract. RBHAs and their subcontracted providers can contact the designated PATH provider in their area to obtain services for those individuals listed below. (See PM Attachment 3.19.2, Arizona PATH Program-Administrators Contact List for PATH information in your area.)

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3.19.5 Definitions
Block Grant

Serious Emotional Disorder (SED)

3.19.6 Objectives
To ensure that RBHAs and providers are aware of:

  • Specific Federal grants awarded to the ADHS/DBHS public behavioral health system;
  • Special populations and prioritized populations covered under each Federal grant; and
  • Responsibilities for delivering covered behavioral health services to the identified special populations.

3.19.7 Overview
The SABG Block Grant, MHBG Block Grant and PATH Grant are all annual formula grants authorized by the United States Congress. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) facilitates these grant awards to states in support of a national system of mental health and substance abuse prevention and treatment services.

Substance Abuse Block Grant (SABG)
The SABG Block Grant supports primary prevention services and treatment services for persons with substance use disorders. It is used to plan, implement and evaluate activities to prevent and treat substance abuse. Grant funds are also used to provide early intervention services for HIV and tuberculosis disease in high-risk substance abusers.

Mental Health Block Grant (MHBG)
The MHBG Block Grant provides funds to establish or expand an organized community-based system of care for providing non-Title XIX mental health services to children with serious emotional disturbances (SED) and adults with serious mental illness (SMI). These funds are used to: (1) carry out the State plan contained in the application; (2) evaluate programs and services, and; (3) conduct planning, administration, and educational activities related to the provision of services.

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3.19.8 Procedures

3.19.8-A. SABG Block Grant
Who is covered and what populations are prioritized?
SABG Block Grant funds are used to ensure access to treatment and long-term recovery support services for (in order of priority):

  • Pregnant women/teenagers who use drugs by injection;
  • Pregnant women/teenagers who use substances;
  • Other persons who use drugs by injection;
  • Substance using women and teenagers with dependent children and their families, including females who are attempting to regain custody of their children; and
  • All other clients with a substance abuse disorder, regardless of gender or route of use, (as funding is available).

Do behavioral health recipients have a choice of substance abuse providers?
Persons receiving substance abuse treatment services under the SABG Block Grant have the right to receive services from a provider to whose religious character they do not object.

Behavioral health subcontractors providing substance abuse services under the SABG Block Grant must notify persons of this right using PM Attachment 3.19.1. Providers must document that the person has received notice in the person’s comprehensive clinical record.

If a person objects to the religious character of a behavioral health provider, the provider must refer the person to an alternative provider within 7 days, or earlier when clinically indicated, after the date of the objection. Upon making such a referral, providers must notify the T/RBHA of the referral and ensure that the person makes contact with the alternative provider. Providers within the Gila River RBHA network should notify the assigned Gila River RBHA Clinician by phone or in writing of any case involving a person objecting to the religious character of a behavioral health provider prior to making a referral to an alternative provider. The Gila River RBHA Clinician will provide assistance in identifying an alternative provider.

What services must be made available to SABG Block Grant special populations?
The following services must be made available to SABG Block Grant special populations:

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Behavioral health providers must provide specialized, gender-specific treatment and recovery support services for females who are pregnant or have dependent children and their families in outpatient/residential treatment settings. Services are also provided to mothers who are attempting to regain custody of their children.  Services must treat the family as a unit.  As needed, providers must admit both mothers and their dependent children into treatment.  The following services are provided or arranged as needed:

  • Referral for primary medical care for pregnant females;
  • Referral for primary pediatric care for children;
  • Gender-specific substance abuse treatment; and
  • Therapeutic interventions for dependent children;

T/RBHAs must ensure the following issues do not pose barriers to access to obtaining substance abuse treatment:

  • Child care;
  • Case management; and
  • Transportation

T/RBHAs must publicize the availability of gender-based substance abuse treatment services for females who are pregnant or have dependent children. Publicizing must include at a minimum the posting of fliers at each site notifying the right of pregnant females and females with dependent children to receive substance abuse treatment services at no cost.

The Gila River RBHA contracts with two substance abuse residential treatment programs that specialize in providing substance abuse treatment to Native American youth and adults. Both programs have the capacity to serve both RBHA enrolled members as well as their minor children. Primary medical care is provided through Indian Health Services (IHS).

Interim Services for Pregnant Women/Injection Drug Users (Non-Title XIX/XXI only)
The purpose of interim services is to reduce the adverse health effects of substance abuse, promote the health of the individual, and reduce the risk of transmission of disease. Provision of interim services must be documented in the client’s chart as well as reported to ADHS through the online waitlist. Interim services are available for Non-Title XIX/XXI priority populations who are maintained on an actively managed wait list. Title XIX/XXI eligible persons who also meet a priority population type may not be placed on a wait list (see Section 3.2, Appointment Standards and Timeliness of Service). The minimum required interim services include:

  • Education that covers:
    • Prevention of and types of behaviors which increase the risk of contracting HIV, Hepatitis C and other sexually transmitted diseases;
    • Effects of substance use on fetal development;
  • Risk assessment/screening;
  • Referrals for HIV, Hepatitis C, and tuberculosis screening and services; and
  • Referrals for primary and prenatal medical care.

SABG Reporting Requirements:
The T/RBHA must ensure that their providers promptly submit information for Priority Population Members (Pregnant Women, Women with Dependent Child(ren) and Intravenous Drug Users) who are waiting for placement in a Level II Residential Treatment Center, to the ADHS/DBHS SABG Waitlist System, or in a different format upon written approval by ADHS/DBHS.

  • Title XIX/XXI persons may not be added to the wait list.

  • Priority Population Members must be added to the wait list if the T/RBHA or its providers are not able to place the person in a Level II Residential Treatment Center within the timeframes prescribed in Section 3.2, Appointment Standards and Timeliness of Service. (For pregnant females the requirement is within 48 hours, for women with dependent children the requirement is within 5 calendar days, and for all IVDUs the requirement is within 14 calendar days.)

  • Non-Title XIX/XXI persons may be added to the wait list if there are no available services. Each T/RBHA must submit an annual plan regarding outreach activities and coordination efforts with local substance abuse coalitions.

Other SABG Requirements:
Each T/RBHA must designate:

  • A lead substance abuse treatment coordinator who will be responsible for ensuring T/RBHA compliance with all SABG requirements;

  • A women’s treatment coordinator;

  • An opiate treatment coordinator;                                              

  • A prevention services administrator; and

  • An HIV early intervention services coordinator

The lead substance abuse treatment coordinator must attend regular meetings with ADHS/DBHS to review services and comply with ADHS/DBHS policies.

HIV Early Intervention Services
Because persons with substance abuse disorders are considered at high risk for contracting HIV-related illness, SABG Block Grant requires HIV intervention services in order to reduce the risk of transmission of this disease.

The assigned Gila River BHS Case Manager should be contacted to access HIV early intervention services.

Who is eligible for HIV early intervention services?

  • Services are provided exclusively to populations with substance abuse disorders.

  • HIV services may not be provided to incarcerated populations.

Requirements for providers offering HIV early intervention services

  • HIV early intervention service providers who accept funding under the SABG grant must provide HIV testing services.
  • Behavioral health providers must administer HIV testing services in accordance with the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) requirements, which requires that any agency that performs HIV testing must register with CMS to obtain CLIA certification.  However agencies may apply for a CLIA Certificate of Waiver which exempts them from regulatory oversight if they meet certain federal statutory requirements.  Many of the Rapid HIV tests are waived.           For a complete list of waived Rapid HIV tests please see (http://www.fda.gov/cdrh/clia/cliawaived.html).  Waived rapid HIV tests can be used at many clinical and non-clinical testing sites, including community and outreach settings. Any agency that is performing waived rapid HIV tests is considered a clinical laboratory.
  • Any provider planning to perform waived rapid HIV tests must develop a quality assurance plan, designed to ensure any HIV testing will be performed accurately.  (See http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/testing/resources/guidelines/qa_guide.htm for Centers for Disease Control Quality Assurance Guidelines)
  • The HIV Prevention Counseling training provided through ADHS must be completed by all T/RBHA HIV Coordinators, provider staff and provider supervisors who’s duties are relevant to HIV services. Staff must successfully complete the training with a passing grade prior to performing HIV testing. HIV education and pre/post test counseling.
  • T/RBHA HIV Coordinators and provider staff delivering HIV Early Intervention Services for the SABG Block Grant must attend an HIV Early Intervention Services Webinar issued by ADHS/DBHS on an annual basis, or as indicated by DBHS. The Webinar will be recorded and made available by DBHS. New staff assigned to duties pertaining to HIV services must view the Webinar as part of their required training prior to delivering any HIV Early Intervention Services reimbursed by the SABG Block Grant.
  • HIV early intervention service providers cannot provide HIV testing until they receive a written HIV test order from a licensed medical doctor, in accordance with  A.R.S. 36-470. HIV rapid testing kits must be obtained from the ADHS Office of HIV.
  • HIV early intervention service providers must actively participate in regional community planning groups to ensure coordination of HIV services.

Reporting requirements for HIV Early Intervention Services
For every occurrence in which an oral swab rapid test provides a reactive result, a confirmatory blood test must be conducted and the blood sample sent to the Arizona Sate Lab for confirmatory testing.

Therefore, each provider who conducts rapid testing must have capacity to collect blood for confirmatory testing whenever rapid testing is conducted.

The number of the confirmatory lab slip will be retained and recorded by the provider. This same number will be used for reporting in the Luther data base. The HIV Early Intervention service provider must establish a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with their local County Health Department to define how data and information will be shared.

Providers must use the Luther database to submit HIV testing data after each test administered.

Monitoring requirements for HIV Early Intervention Services
T/RBHAs must collect monthly progress reports from subcontracted providers and submit quarterly progress reports to ADHS/DBHS.

Site visits to provider offering HIV Early Intervention Services must be conducted bi-annually. The ADHS/DBHS HIV Coordinator, T/RBHA HIV Coordinator, provider staff and supervisors relevant to HIV services must be in attendance during staff visits.

  • A budget review and description/justification for use of funding must be made available by the provider as part of the site visit.

Minimum performance expectations
T/RBHAs are expected to administer a minimum of 1 test per $100 in HIV funding.

Considerations when delivering services to SABG Block Grant populations
SABG Block Grant treatment services must be designed to support the long-term treatment and substance-free recovery needs of eligible persons. Specific requirements apply regarding preferential access to services and the timeliness of responding to a person’s identified needs (see Section 3.2, Appointment Standards and Timeliness of Service for requirements). Behavioral health providers must also submit specific data elements to identify special populations and record limited clinical information (see Section 7.5, Enrollment, Disenrollment and Other Data Submission for requirements).

Restrictions on the use of SABG Block Grant funds
The State shall not expend SABG Block Grant funds on the following activities:

  • To provide inpatient hospital services; with the exception of detox services;

  • To make cash payments to intended recipients of health services;

  • To purchase or improve land, purchase, construct, or permanently improve (other than minor remodeling) any building or other facility, or purchase major medical equipment;

  • To satisfy any requirement for the expenditure of non-Federal funds as a condition for the receipt of Federal funds (Maintenance of Effort);

  • To provide financial assistance to any entity other than a public or nonprofit private entity;

  • To provide individuals with hypodermic needles or syringes so that such individuals may use illegal drugs, unless the Surgeon General of the Public Health Service determines that a demonstration needle exchange program would be effective in reducing drug abuse and the risk that the public will become infected with the etiologic agent for AIDS;

  • To pay the salary of an individual through a grant or other extramural mechanism at a rate in excess of Level I of the Executive Salary Schedule for the award year; see http://grants.nih.gov/grants/policy/salcap_summary.htm; and

  • To purchase treatment services in penal or correctional institutions of the State of Arizona .

Room and Board (H0046 SE) services funded by the SABG Block Grant are limited to children/adolescents with a Substance Use Disorder (SUD), and adult priority population members (pregnant females, females with dependent child(ren), and intravenous drug users with a SUD).

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3.19.8-B: MHBG Block Grant
Who is covered and what populations are prioritized?
The MHBG Block Grant provides non-Title XIX/XXI behavioral health services to adults with SMI and children with SED.

The MHBG Block Grant must be used:

  • To ensure access to a comprehensive system of care, including employment, housing, case management, rehabilitation, dental , and health services, as well as mental health services and supports;
  • To promote participation by consumer/survivors and their families in planning and implementing services and programs, as well as in evaluating State mental health systems;
  • To ensure access for underserved populations, including people who are homeless, residents of rural areas, and older adults;
  • To promote recovery and community integration for adults with SMI and children with SED;
  • To provide for a system of integrated services to include:
  • Social services;
  • Educational services;
  • Juvenile justice services;
  • Substance abuse services;
  • Health and behavioral health services; and
  • To provide for training of providers of emergency health services regarding behavioral health.

Restrictions on the use of MHBG Block Grant Funds
The State shall not expend MHBG Block Grant funds on the following activities:

  • To provide inpatient hospital services; with the exception of detox services;
  • To make cash payments to intended recipients of health services;
  • To purchase or improve land, purchase, construct, or permanently improve (other than minor remodeling) any building or other facility, or purchase major medical equipment;
  • To satisfy any requirement for the expenditure of non-Federal funds as a condition for the receipt of Federal funds (Maintenance of Effort);
  • To provide financial assistance to any entity other than a public or nonprofit private entity;
  • To provide individuals with hypodermic needles or syringes so that such individuals may use illegal drugs, unless the Surgeon General of the Public Health Service determines that a demonstration needle exchange program would be effective in reducing drug abuse and the risk that the public will become infected with the etiologic agent for AIDS;
  • To pay the salary of an individual through a grant or other extramural mechanism at a rate in excess of Level I of the Executive Salary Schedule for the award year; see http://grants.nih.gov/grants/policy/salcap_summary.htm; and
  • To purchase treatment services in penal or correctional institutions of the State of Arizona.

Room and Board services funded by the MHBG Block Grant are limited to children with SED.

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3.19 Special Populations
Last Revised: 4/1/2015
Effective Date: 4/1/2015

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